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modfarm:

How To: Stock a Cellar
How to prepare for the zombie apocalypse? Stock your cellar the right way.

modfarm:

How To: Stock a Cellar

How to prepare for the zombie apocalypse? Stock your cellar the right way.

On Influence: A Human Needs to Respond to Marketers

We Create Influence in the World

Our industry keeps coming up with buzz words. Throwing these words around may make some people feel like an expert on the next big trend, but we’re forgetting the big picture. Our role in the world of marketing is not only about creating awareness, telling stories, or mining data, but about creating relevance. We may do these things, but our end goal goes beyond creating ads or likes or impressions. We are creating influence in the world. 

Influence is the only thing that really matters to a brand. Only influential brands are relevant. Only influential brands can change the way people think, live and behave. Influence shapes societies, impacts cultures and adds value to people’s lives. And we do this the way our ideas have always created impact, by finding the relevant truth, communicating in fresh new ways and by respecting and understanding people. It takes time to build the trust required to become an influential brand. But people remember how you make them feel, rather than what you say or do. That emotional connection is the ultimate prize for any organization. 

The age of awareness is over. Consumers have so much information at their fingertips that marketing no longer plays a meaningful role in making them aware of what a product is or what a service offers. The lines between online and offline continue to blur. We need to finally stop thinking of social as a medium. It is the technology infrastructure that helps us do our jobs smarter and deliver something meaningful and useful to people.

http://lemon2020.com/tagged/Issue-34:-Generate-Influence?utm_source=baby-name&utm_campaign=6124b3e830-Issue+34:+Generate+Influence&utm_medium=manual-link

mikerogge:

A video interview with “Deep” author Porter Fox for ESPN. 

mikerogge:

A video interview with “Deep” author Porter Fox for ESPN

Skiing’s Endangered Future

'Deep: The Story of Skiing and the Future of Snow'

Ski journalist Porter Fox knows what you’re thinking: Sure, climate change is a concern. But do we really need to be worried about how it’s impacting the people who can afford hefty lift tickets in Vail and the Alps? As Fox saw firsthand, even those on the mountains don’t seem freaked out. “If you’re a skier and there hasn’t been snow for two weeks, you start thinking about climate change,” Fox says. “Then you get three feet of powder and say, ‘There’s no such thing as climate change.’ It’s not very conducive to convincing people it’s happening.”

Making that case is the point of Fox’s ‘Deep: The Story of Skiing and the Future of Snow,’ the first book to comprehensively address the effect of climate change on snowfall and the ski industry. Inspired by ‘The Wave,’ Susan Casey’s bestseller about the impact of changing weather patterns on the oceans and surfing, Fox pulled the latest snowfall research. A lifelong skier who grew up in Maine and often hit New York’s Sugarloaf Mountain, Fox was stunned to read one study that suggested half of the Northeast’s ski resorts could be shuttered by 2039 due to lack of sufficient snowfall. “I’d been working for ‘Powder’ magazine since 1999, and I had no idea,” he says. “Nobody I knew personally in the skiing world had any idea how quickly snow was [disappearing]. I realized I was going to see it in my lifetime.”

Fox’s research took him to Europe, which is even closer to crisis than we are. On the Gurschen glacier in Switzerland, ski-patrol guides employ a 30,000-square-foot sheet of plastic to cover the glacier in an attempt to keep it from melting. Fox learned that, in time, American ski venues would also have dramatically shortened seasons and a greater threat of avalanches, due to the effect of more rainfall on snow. The results will be a boon for makers of artificial snow but a death knell for the sport itself.

One challenge for Fox was sifting through mountains of data, much of it speculation and some even contradictory. While a 2012 U.S. study projected the federal government could lose as much as $1.7 billion in annual tax revenue with less snow, he also encountered bogus reports written by climate-change dissenters, claiming climate change had stopped. “I had a full-time fact checker, but you can read the same study three years apart and the data is different,” he says. “Some papers can feel alarmist. You have to be very careful and strike a line in the middle.”

Fox uncovered one undeniable concern: Many ski resorts – and the people who live and work near them – are hardly leaping into action. He believes these businesses have been slow to react, partly because they’re more focused on day-to-day survival – the number of people who ski has barely changed since 1979. “The denial is quite widespread,” says Auden Schendler, vice president of sustainability at the Aspen Skiing Company. “Or, worse, [skiers know] it’s happening, but the reaction is, ‘Well, we’ll change our lightbulbs.’ “

The larger point of ‘Deep’ is that as snow recedes, problems beyond the tourism business will, of course, mount. Higher temperatures in the American West, for instance, mean more mountain pine beetles, which have already ravaged 23 million acres of forest since 2000. “A lot of people say fighting climate change to save skiing is ridiculous, and to a certain extent, they’re right,” says Fox. “Skiing is a luxury. But skiers just happen to be the ones who spend a lot of time in the snow and see it first. And they should be responsible for calling from the bell tower what’s happening.”



Read more: http://www.mensjournal.com/adventure/skiing-boarding/skiings-endangered-future-20140109#ixzz3GQY8a7Bd 
Follow us: @mensjournal on Twitter | MensJournal on Facebook

The United States of Alcoholism

jkottke:

Drinking Rate USA

30% of Americans don’t drink any alcohol during a typical week. On the other end of the scale, ten percent of Americans consume more than 10 drinks every single day. More from Wonkblog.

I double-checked these figures with Cook, just to make sure I wasn’t reading them wrong. “I agree…

Millennials and VICE advice

1. Know Where Your Audience Is Coming From

In order to make content young people will trust, accept, and like, you need to know about the decade that formed them and shaped their consciousness, said Moretti. “In the decade of the 2000s, it was the march of two opposing forces – a crisis of information and the liberation of information,” he said. The “crisis” includes all of the major bad things that happened during the last decade, from the war on terror, to climate change and the economic collapse.

The biggest casualty of the decade, however, was a loss of trust. “Millennials lost trust in politicians and experts and systems [social security, etc.],” said Moretti. They also lost trust in the media.

As far as the “liberation of information” - that came with the rapid advancements in computing, connectivity, and social media. Basically the rise of digital and mobile access.

Though Millennials have the reputation of being self indulgent selfie-takers, VICE found through direct conversations with their fans that they do care deeply about the world they live in, and they were looking for a non-traditional news source — certainly not their parents’ broadcast and cable news channels — to keep them informed.

2. Meet Them Where They Are - On Social

The dilemma of living in a liberated universe of information is that the real news mediators are social media platforms, Moretti explained, citing social media as the number one driver of traffic to VICE News. “We talk to people in surveys, and 75 percent get news from social media.”

But on these channels, “sh*t happens in bite-sized headlines,” and therefore, there is no depth. “We become addicted to scanning because of fear of missing out, but because of the flow of headlines, it produces the effect of not caring,” says Moretti. “In the context of news, this is a bad paradigm.”

3. Make Them Care

Moretti believes that video is the differentiator.

“Video is an empathy machine. It slows down the headlines, and expands them so we can connect more deeply with people and cultures,” he said. “The future of news for Millennials will be built on empathy.”

Instead of skimming a headline that says “23 people died in Fallujah,” VICE’s goal is to show the raw, and real reaction on the ground of such a tragedy. So far, so good. Since its launch, VICE News has been recognized as an ambitious news brand, forming partnerships and expanding globally, already boasting nearly one million YouTube subscribers.

“We found ourselves as the voice of this Millennial generation. They are going to come of age and make business and life decisions. They are going to be the biggest cohort in terms of business and power since baby boomers. We should always be speaking to the next leaders of the world.”

http://blog.newscred.com/article/how-to-get-millennials-to-love-your-content-vices-magic-formula/674e85edb47659575ad1ee535510bbe0

modfarm:

How To: Stock a Cellar
How to prepare for the zombie apocalypse? Stock your cellar the right way.

modfarm:

How To: Stock a Cellar

How to prepare for the zombie apocalypse? Stock your cellar the right way.

On Influence: A Human Needs to Respond to Marketers

We Create Influence in the World

Our industry keeps coming up with buzz words. Throwing these words around may make some people feel like an expert on the next big trend, but we’re forgetting the big picture. Our role in the world of marketing is not only about creating awareness, telling stories, or mining data, but about creating relevance. We may do these things, but our end goal goes beyond creating ads or likes or impressions. We are creating influence in the world. 

Influence is the only thing that really matters to a brand. Only influential brands are relevant. Only influential brands can change the way people think, live and behave. Influence shapes societies, impacts cultures and adds value to people’s lives. And we do this the way our ideas have always created impact, by finding the relevant truth, communicating in fresh new ways and by respecting and understanding people. It takes time to build the trust required to become an influential brand. But people remember how you make them feel, rather than what you say or do. That emotional connection is the ultimate prize for any organization. 

The age of awareness is over. Consumers have so much information at their fingertips that marketing no longer plays a meaningful role in making them aware of what a product is or what a service offers. The lines between online and offline continue to blur. We need to finally stop thinking of social as a medium. It is the technology infrastructure that helps us do our jobs smarter and deliver something meaningful and useful to people.

http://lemon2020.com/tagged/Issue-34:-Generate-Influence?utm_source=baby-name&utm_campaign=6124b3e830-Issue+34:+Generate+Influence&utm_medium=manual-link

mikerogge:

A video interview with “Deep” author Porter Fox for ESPN. 

mikerogge:

A video interview with “Deep” author Porter Fox for ESPN

Skiing’s Endangered Future

'Deep: The Story of Skiing and the Future of Snow'

Ski journalist Porter Fox knows what you’re thinking: Sure, climate change is a concern. But do we really need to be worried about how it’s impacting the people who can afford hefty lift tickets in Vail and the Alps? As Fox saw firsthand, even those on the mountains don’t seem freaked out. “If you’re a skier and there hasn’t been snow for two weeks, you start thinking about climate change,” Fox says. “Then you get three feet of powder and say, ‘There’s no such thing as climate change.’ It’s not very conducive to convincing people it’s happening.”

Making that case is the point of Fox’s ‘Deep: The Story of Skiing and the Future of Snow,’ the first book to comprehensively address the effect of climate change on snowfall and the ski industry. Inspired by ‘The Wave,’ Susan Casey’s bestseller about the impact of changing weather patterns on the oceans and surfing, Fox pulled the latest snowfall research. A lifelong skier who grew up in Maine and often hit New York’s Sugarloaf Mountain, Fox was stunned to read one study that suggested half of the Northeast’s ski resorts could be shuttered by 2039 due to lack of sufficient snowfall. “I’d been working for ‘Powder’ magazine since 1999, and I had no idea,” he says. “Nobody I knew personally in the skiing world had any idea how quickly snow was [disappearing]. I realized I was going to see it in my lifetime.”

Fox’s research took him to Europe, which is even closer to crisis than we are. On the Gurschen glacier in Switzerland, ski-patrol guides employ a 30,000-square-foot sheet of plastic to cover the glacier in an attempt to keep it from melting. Fox learned that, in time, American ski venues would also have dramatically shortened seasons and a greater threat of avalanches, due to the effect of more rainfall on snow. The results will be a boon for makers of artificial snow but a death knell for the sport itself.

One challenge for Fox was sifting through mountains of data, much of it speculation and some even contradictory. While a 2012 U.S. study projected the federal government could lose as much as $1.7 billion in annual tax revenue with less snow, he also encountered bogus reports written by climate-change dissenters, claiming climate change had stopped. “I had a full-time fact checker, but you can read the same study three years apart and the data is different,” he says. “Some papers can feel alarmist. You have to be very careful and strike a line in the middle.”

Fox uncovered one undeniable concern: Many ski resorts – and the people who live and work near them – are hardly leaping into action. He believes these businesses have been slow to react, partly because they’re more focused on day-to-day survival – the number of people who ski has barely changed since 1979. “The denial is quite widespread,” says Auden Schendler, vice president of sustainability at the Aspen Skiing Company. “Or, worse, [skiers know] it’s happening, but the reaction is, ‘Well, we’ll change our lightbulbs.’ “

The larger point of ‘Deep’ is that as snow recedes, problems beyond the tourism business will, of course, mount. Higher temperatures in the American West, for instance, mean more mountain pine beetles, which have already ravaged 23 million acres of forest since 2000. “A lot of people say fighting climate change to save skiing is ridiculous, and to a certain extent, they’re right,” says Fox. “Skiing is a luxury. But skiers just happen to be the ones who spend a lot of time in the snow and see it first. And they should be responsible for calling from the bell tower what’s happening.”



Read more: http://www.mensjournal.com/adventure/skiing-boarding/skiings-endangered-future-20140109#ixzz3GQY8a7Bd 
Follow us: @mensjournal on Twitter | MensJournal on Facebook

The United States of Alcoholism

jkottke:

Drinking Rate USA

30% of Americans don’t drink any alcohol during a typical week. On the other end of the scale, ten percent of Americans consume more than 10 drinks every single day. More from Wonkblog.

I double-checked these figures with Cook, just to make sure I wasn’t reading them wrong. “I agree…

Millennials and VICE advice

1. Know Where Your Audience Is Coming From

In order to make content young people will trust, accept, and like, you need to know about the decade that formed them and shaped their consciousness, said Moretti. “In the decade of the 2000s, it was the march of two opposing forces – a crisis of information and the liberation of information,” he said. The “crisis” includes all of the major bad things that happened during the last decade, from the war on terror, to climate change and the economic collapse.

The biggest casualty of the decade, however, was a loss of trust. “Millennials lost trust in politicians and experts and systems [social security, etc.],” said Moretti. They also lost trust in the media.

As far as the “liberation of information” - that came with the rapid advancements in computing, connectivity, and social media. Basically the rise of digital and mobile access.

Though Millennials have the reputation of being self indulgent selfie-takers, VICE found through direct conversations with their fans that they do care deeply about the world they live in, and they were looking for a non-traditional news source — certainly not their parents’ broadcast and cable news channels — to keep them informed.

2. Meet Them Where They Are - On Social

The dilemma of living in a liberated universe of information is that the real news mediators are social media platforms, Moretti explained, citing social media as the number one driver of traffic to VICE News. “We talk to people in surveys, and 75 percent get news from social media.”

But on these channels, “sh*t happens in bite-sized headlines,” and therefore, there is no depth. “We become addicted to scanning because of fear of missing out, but because of the flow of headlines, it produces the effect of not caring,” says Moretti. “In the context of news, this is a bad paradigm.”

3. Make Them Care

Moretti believes that video is the differentiator.

“Video is an empathy machine. It slows down the headlines, and expands them so we can connect more deeply with people and cultures,” he said. “The future of news for Millennials will be built on empathy.”

Instead of skimming a headline that says “23 people died in Fallujah,” VICE’s goal is to show the raw, and real reaction on the ground of such a tragedy. So far, so good. Since its launch, VICE News has been recognized as an ambitious news brand, forming partnerships and expanding globally, already boasting nearly one million YouTube subscribers.

“We found ourselves as the voice of this Millennial generation. They are going to come of age and make business and life decisions. They are going to be the biggest cohort in terms of business and power since baby boomers. We should always be speaking to the next leaders of the world.”

http://blog.newscred.com/article/how-to-get-millennials-to-love-your-content-vices-magic-formula/674e85edb47659575ad1ee535510bbe0

On Influence: A Human Needs to Respond to Marketers
Skiing’s Endangered Future
Millennials and VICE advice

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